Tag Archives: Voiceover

Write it How You Want it Said

If you’re new to the game of writing a script for voiceover one of the main things to remember is: write it how you want it said.

Write it how you want it said when writing a voiceover scriptThis is especially true if your voice-over talent is recording your script without you there, either in-person or on the phone. If your talent isn’t clear on what you mean, they have to guess — and they may guess wrong. That will cost you time, and can cost you money too. So write it how you want it said.

So Many Choices

Let’s say your script is about the CAB-7506 Widget your company has just developed. You write, “The CAB-7506 widget is the state of the art widget for the 21st Century.”

As a voice-over talent, the first thing I wonder is, “How do I say ‘CAB-7506’?”

Here are some of the ways I can read that:

  • cab seventy-five oh six
  • cab seven thousand five hundred six
  • cab seventy-five hundred oh six
  • cab seven five oh six
  • cab seven five zero six
  • c-a-b seventy-five oh six
  • c-a-b seven thousand five hundred six
  • c-a-b seventy-five hundred oh six
  • c-a-b seven five oh six
  • c-a-b seven five zero six

And there are probably a few others I haven’t even thought of at this point.

Then I’ll wonder if you want the “-” in there, like, “cab dash seventy five oh six” or the dash with one of the other permutations. Or do you want me to say “hyphen” instead?

See how complicated it all can get? Write it how you want it said.

But Can’t The Talent Check?

Some will say that it’s simple enough for the talent to make a phone call for clarification. It may not really be that simple. I do a lot of voiceover for clients in other parts of the world and that means that I might be recording something when it’s the middle of the night for my client. I’m not going to get an answer, I’ll have to stop recording the project, and it might delay things for a day or more.

A good rule of thumb when you finish writing, is to read your script out loud. When you find items that are company-specific or industry-specific think whether those can be said multiple ways. If so, write it how you want it said.

In the end, a few extra minutes up front can save a lot more time further along in the project.

Here is another script tip that will help you when writing for voice-overs:

Say What?

I’ll have some others for you soon.

 

Say What?

Pronunciation – Script Tip

Here’s a simple tip to save money on your voiceover recording sessions.

When you write a script for a voiceover, keep in mind that the voice talent may not know the pronunciations of all the words in your script. Most voice talents have a fairly well-developed vocabulary because they’ve read lots of scripts during their careers. However, we can’t possibly know the correct way to say every word.

This is especially true for words that are specific to your business or your industry, and for regional pronunciations of locations, medical terms, jargon, names, and the like.

pronunciation image from dictionary

Be Prepared

Even if you’re involved in the recording session, it’s a good idea to include pronunciations in your script. That will help move the session along without stops to check how to say things. That can save you money since the session won’t run longer while you look up a word.

This should go without saying, but don’t guess at how something should be pronounced. If you don’t know the word, check with someone who knows or look it up. Use the links below to check words you don’t know.

Make It Easy

Here are some tips to make it easy for the voice talent to record your script.

1. Don’t use complicated dictionary pronunciations.

For example, the Merriam-Webster online dictionary uses this cryptic code for saying the word “pronunciation:”

prə-ˌnən(t)-sē-ˈā-shən

Now does anyone, besides a linguist, really know how to read that?

How do you say an upside down “e?” I have NO idea! And there are three of them there!

Even for those who know how to say an upside down “e” that jumble of symbols will slow things down during recording. Instead . . .

2. Use simple guides on how to say something.

Sound out the word and come up with an easy way to convey that.

Back to our word “pronunciation.” How about showing that as:

pro-nun-see-A-shun?

Much simpler, right?

Notice what I did with the upper case “A” there? It’s upper case because that’s the emphasized syllable. Capitalize all the letters in the syllable or syllables to be stressed.

3. Put the pronunciations in-line.

In other words, include it right where the word shows up in the script. Having a separate page with pronunciations is fine, but you should also include them in the script right where those hard to say words appear.

Something like this:
“When you need a pronunciation (pro-nun-see-A-shun) in a voice over script make it as easy as possible for the voice talent.”

4. Provide a link to an online version of how to say the word.

I do a lot of medical narrations and one of my clients always includes links so I can hear the words sounded out. Those links are in addition to having the pronunciation written out in the script.

When I review the script before recording it, I can quickly check those words and hear how to say them. Just be sure that the way it’s being said at the online site is the way you want it said. I’ve heard different ways to say a word depending on the site.

5. When in doubt, sound it out

If you question whether a pronunciation should be included in the script, go ahead and include it. It’s better to have them and not need them, than need them and not have them.

6. Don’t assume

You know what they say when you assume? Just because “everyone” in your industry or your part of the world knows how to say something don’t assume that the voice talent will know.

Here’s a simple regionalism as an example.

I’ve lived in both New Mexico and Colorado, two states that share a border, but don’t share how to say the word Zuni.

New Mexico is home to the Zuni tribe of Native Americans. In New Mexico, Zuni is pronounced ZOO-knee.

However, there’s a street in Denver named Zuni, but that one is said like ZOON-eye. Same word, two different ways to say it.

7. Don’t be stingy

If a word is used frequently in a script you can probably drop the pronunciation after the 3rd or 4th time it’s used. By then the voice talent should have it down. But if it’s infrequent and is separated by minutes of recording, then include how to say it whenever the word shows up. See tip #5.

Here are links to sites which have audio versions of how to say lots of words:

Merriam-Webster
Dictionary.com
How-J-Say.com
HowToPronounce.com
Dorsey Anderson YouTube Channel with Medical Terminology

 

 

Medical Narration Demo Updated

Recording a medical narration is always a challenge because of the often complicated terms in the script. But that’s one of the things I enjoy about doing a medical voice-over.

After looking back at some of my recent medical voiceovers I realized it was time to update my medical narration demo.

These are some of the clients who have used my voice for medical narration:

  • BLINCYTO® (blinatumomab)
  • EMPLICITI™ (elotuzumab)
  • Kcentra® (Prothrombin Complex Concentrate [Human])
  • Kineret® (anakinra)
  • Brexpiprazole
  • Swan Valley Medical Incorporated
  • Boston Scientific
  • Essilor
  • MEDamorphis
  • Merit Medical
  • Cardene IV
  • EyeMed
  • Random42 Medical Animation
  • Abbott Nutrition

Of course in addition to voiceover for medical narrations, I also do eLearning, corporate narration, commercials, on-hold messages, real estate home tours, and other voiceovers. Visit my Demos page to hear my other voice-over demos.

 

On-Hold Messages: Why They Are Vital For Your Business

Customer on-hold are left in the cold

Every interaction you have with your customer is vital to the success of your business. From the radio and TV commercials you run to get customers in the door. To the way you treat the customer after the sale.

Everything you do needs to be designed to communicate your message.

Why should it be any different when a customer calls you on the phone?

Think about this. A customer has taken the time to pick up the phone to call you. Maybe that customer is ready to make a huge purchase. Or maybe a question about your product or service needs to be answered.

Regardless of the nature of the call, you have another opportunity to interact with that customer. However, the person who answers the phone isn’t the one who can answer the question. So the caller is placed on hold. Stuck on Hold

If that caller hears silence it may seem like they’ve been hung up on and they may hang up.

Or worse, what if that caller gets placed on hold and hears a radio station that is running a commercial for one of your competitors? Uh-oh! That can be a huge problem. You may lose that customer and the sale to your competition and probably never even realize it.

There are also legal ramifications to playing a radio station or other music to your on-hold callers. If you don’t have an ASCAP license you can’t legally play copyrighted music through your phone system. And even though the radio station you’re playing to callers has paid its ASCAP fees you still aren’t legally able to retransmit that signal. The radio station likely won’t mind — they want all the listeners they can get. However, playing a radio station over the phone is actually a violation of the law.

But with a telephone on-hold message, you can solve these problems. And give yourself another opportunity to sell to that customer. First, your customer will realize they haven’t been disconnected. Second, they’re hearing about your business.

You’re reinforcing your sales message. You can tell the customer how important you think they are. Plus you can tell them about products or services they might not be aware of.

Third, you won’t be violating any music copyright laws with a custom-produced telephone on-hold message.

Sick of being on-holdYou never want to leave customers on hold for very long, but it’s an inevitable part of daily business. Why not use that time to make your customer feel important and take another opportunity to interact with your customers?

I began producing telephone messages-on-hold for clients across the country more than 15 years ago. A custom-produced on-hold message can be updated on a regular basis to reflect changes in products, services, prices, and specials. They’re easy to update for holidays or special promotions. And they’ll give your business an edge over the competition.

Take a listen to my On-Hold Messages demo right now. If you’d like to learn more about telephone on-hold messaging please call me at (303) 915-9317 or email me at tim@weboutloud.com.

 

 

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